Apr 29, 2022

NASA Scientists Intrigued By Possible Signs of Life on Saturn’s Moon


There is constantly significant news coming from space. Scientists and researchers are doing considerable research on Mars, uncovering new sorts of supernovas and establishing couplings between neutron stars and black holes. However, there is nothing quite as fascinating for the rest of us humans as the prospect of life on other worlds. 

Although no verifiable extraterrestrial encounters on any planet have been reported so far, there may be signs of life around Saturn. Yes, the planet that many youngsters like (due to its rings, of course) may have some bacteria on one of its several moons.

This development, which we learned about through New Atlas, is rather interesting. According to the study, something is generating methane on Saturn's moon Enceladus. Methane is a greenhouse gas that microbes create and degrade concurrently. 

On Enceladus, the amounts of methane are so high that they are consistent with what scientists would anticipate from bacteria.

On Enceladus, the amounts of methane are so high that they are consistent with what scientists would anticipate from bacteria.

Given its cold exterior surface, Enceladus does not seem to be an ideal environment for microscopic life. Beyond that layer, though, is an ocean-like slush with a bottom dotted with hydrothermal vents. This liquid element sometimes bursts through its frigid shell in the form of water plumes, much like a geyser on Earth.

Additionally, NASA/ESA/Cassini ISA's space probe discovered carbon dioxide and dihydrogen while studying the ringed planet and its moons. What does this imply? Microbes are almost certain to be present down there. 

“Obviously, we are not concluding that life exists in Enceladus’ ocean,” says Régis Ferrière, lead author of the research. “Rather, we wanted to understand how likely it would be that Enceladus’ hydrothermal vents could be habitable to Earthlike microorganisms. Very likely, the Cassini data tell us, according to our models. And biological methanogenesis appears to be compatible with the data.”

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