Jun 30, 2020

NASA Rover Captures What A Solar Eclipse Looks Like On Mars

In our Solar System, any planet with moons has a chance for a solar eclipse.
Solar eclipses are possible on Earth, and occur whenever the Moon aligns with the Earth-Sun plane... [+] during a new Moon. This same principle applies to any planet with a moon.
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They occur whenever a moon passes directly between its planet parent and the Sun.
An illustration of the Sun-Moon-Earth configuration setting up a total solar eclipse. When the... [+] Moon's shadow falls on Earth when the nearer-to-the-Sun node aligns, we get a solar eclipse: total if the Moon's shadow falls on the Earth, annular if the shadow ends before reaching Earth, and partial if the alignment is too imperfect.
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From planet Earth, they can appear partial, total, or annular.
From Earth, eclipses can be partial, annular, or total, owing to the large angular size of our Moon... [+] as seen from Earth's surface. From Mars, both of its moons are too small to create total solar eclipses.
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But on Mars, only partial or annular eclipses occur.
The closer and larger of Mars's moons, Phobos, makes for a completely alien sight during solar... [+] eclipses. Annual eclipses occur frequently on Mars, even appearing perfectly aligned on occasion to the Curiosity Rover.
NASA/JPL-CALTECH/MALIN SPACE SCIENCE SYSTEMS/TEXAS A&M UNIV.

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